Brembo, Designing Emotions is an exhibition that brings together creativity, art and industrial design to generate new emotions in the automotive field and the related design. The artists invited to take part in this project drew inspiration exclusively from Brembo brake calipers, with no other restrictions being imposed upon them, as is only right given that their research is what has made them leading names on the international art scene. Their research and ideas are sources of emotion that add a piece of history to those civilised relations between culture and the industrial world, as described to us by Silvia De Laude, philologist and literary expert, and Jacqueline Cerasoli, one of the greatest historians and art critics of her generation, in two essays that span history and modernity, extending all the way through to the contemporary period. When culture and industry come together in the name of design, they are a pairing that really makes Italy stand out in the world. Today, faced with a crisis that is threatening the values of a national identity, which risks losing precious reference points, they can be an invaluable resource for working towards the common good in an ethical and responsible manner. Ethics and responsibility: this is the real, unique and irreplaceable heritage of every country that deserves this name.

Moreno Gentili, concept designer "Brembo Designing emotions"

Using the language of mathematics, the start and arrival point of this experimentation path is indicated below.
To Brembo brake calipers, add (+) creativity and the experience of each artist to obtain the result (=) of the works that join creativity, art and industrial design."

 
VIDEO
Ilaria Bochicchio
Battipaglia, 1988
This largely self-taught artist has experimented with different styles and techniques: painting, digital art, sculpture and live performance. She started studying painting in an attempt to interpret a condition that recalls the sensation of human existence. The infinite layers of colour in her works are trapped beneath the final white coat, which offers glimpses of the bodies within like a worn membrane of skin.
VIDEO
Happy news
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Mario Airò
Pavia, 1961
Never favouring any particular technique, but instead always turning to what best fits the context in question, Airò embodies a way of conceiving the artistic language that is free from all dogma and is free to act flexibly. This adaptability is also put forward as a philosophical and political approach, where every rule can be revoked or questioned, while respect for vitality in all its many forms of expression remains a staple.
VIDEO
Reverie luddista
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Silvia Codignola
Ivrea, 1962
Silvia Codignola uses painting and sculpture (sometimes combined) and borrows iconographic materials, linguistic and technical codes from tradition. She recreates the figure going beyond mimesis, in a purification of the contingent, producing an effect of suspended time and self-sufficiency in her dreamlike and visionary artwork. The artist works with unconscious and immediate images within an idea of beauty that, as Massimo Donà observed, takes us back to that "original sacred aura in which all creatures are clad."
VIDEO
Round about
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Melina Mulas
Milano, 1960
Melina Mulas crosses the photographic space with the awareness of a time that cannot be measured in terms of speed, but instead in terms of attention and inner intent. Her portraits capture the subjects at the most exposed point of their vulnerability and, at the same time, their strength. With a family background in photography – Ugo Mulas, her father, left an indelible mark on the history of international art – she has not yielded to a hereditary style in her work, but has instead gone far beyond, migrating towards her own experiential research that fluctuates between image, didactics and the attention owed to those who make their awareness of the world a modus vivendi of human thought.
VIDEO
Matrice
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Barbara Fässler
Zurigo 1962
Barbara Fässler is primarily a conceptual artist with an interest in relationships and artistic mediation. She has worked with installations, photography, drawing and video for years, writing regularly for international contemporary art magazines such as Studija (LV) and Kunstbulletin (CH). She also curates exhibitions and experimental cultural exchange projects and teaches art and art history.
VIDEO
L'ombra bianca
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Bruna Ginammi
Bergamo, 1964
This artist meets, gets to know and explores people’s faces through the medium of photography. The word “person” comes from the Latin, which probably has its roots in the Etruscan term “Phersu” (actor’s mask, character).
The concept of person is primarily a philosophical one, which conveys the unique nature of every individual member of the human race.
VIDEO
Maori line
Galleria
 
VIDEO
Marzia Migliora
Alessandria, 1972
Marzia Migliora's work unfolds through a wide range of media including photography, video, sound, performance, installation and drawing. Her works originate in her profound focus on individuals and their daily lives. The recurrent themes of her research are memory as a tool for recounting the present or the analysis of employment as a statement of participation in society. This results in a composite work able to fuel a shared experience, generating strong emotional and intellectual involvement among the public.
VIDEO
Keep me safe
Galleria
Ilaria Bochicchio
Battipaglia, 1988
This largely self-taught artist has experimented with different styles and techniques: painting, digital art, sculpture and live performance. She started studying painting in an attempt to interpret a condition that recalls the sensation of human existence. The infinite layers of colour in her works are trapped beneath the final white coat, which offers glimpses of the bodies within like a worn membrane of skin.
Happy news
Mario Airò
Pavia, 1961
Never favouring any particular technique, but instead always turning to what best fits the context in question, Airò embodies a way of conceiving the artistic language that is free from all dogma and is free to act flexibly. This adaptability is also put forward as a philosophical and political approach, where every rule can be revoked or questioned, while respect for vitality in all its many forms of expression remains a staple.
Reverie luddista
Silvia Codignola
Ivrea, 1962
Silvia Codignola uses painting and sculpture (sometimes combined) and borrows iconographic materials, linguistic and technical codes from tradition. She recreates the figure going beyond mimesis, in a purification of the contingent, producing an effect of suspended time and self-sufficiency in her dreamlike and visionary artwork. The artist works with unconscious and immediate images within an idea of beauty that, as Massimo Donà observed, takes us back to that "original sacred aura in which all creatures are clad."
Round about
Melina Mulas
Milano, 1960
Melina Mulas crosses the photographic space with the awareness of a time that cannot be measured in terms of speed, but instead in terms of attention and inner intent. Her portraits capture the subjects at the most exposed point of their vulnerability and, at the same time, their strength. With a family background in photography – Ugo Mulas, her father, left an indelible mark on the history of international art – she has not yielded to a hereditary style in her work, but has instead gone far beyond, migrating towards her own experiential research that fluctuates between image, didactics and the attention owed to those who make their awareness of the world a modus vivendi of human thought.
Matrice
Barbara Fässler
Zurigo 1962
Barbara Fässler is primarily a conceptual artist with an interest in relationships and artistic mediation. She has worked with installations, photography, drawing and video for years, writing regularly for international contemporary art magazines such as Studija (LV) and Kunstbulletin (CH). She also curates exhibitions and experimental cultural exchange projects and teaches art and art history.
L'ombra bianca
Bruna Ginammi
Bergamo, 1964
This artist meets, gets to know and explores people's faces through the medium of photography. The word "person" comes from the Latin, which probably has its roots in the Etruscan term "Phersu" (actor's mask, character). The concept of person is primarily a philosophical one, which conveys the unique nature of every individual member of the human race.
Maori line
Marzia Migliora
Alessandria, 1972
Marzia Migliora's work unfolds through a wide range of media including photography, video, sound, performance, installation and drawing. Her works originate in her profound focus on individuals and their daily lives. The recurrent themes of her research are memory as a tool for recounting the present or the analysis of employment as a statement of participation in society. This results in a composite work able to fuel a shared experience, generating strong emotional and intellectual involvement among the public.
Keep me safe

Where and when

Location

Sala Buzzati - Fondazione Corriere della Sera
Via Eugenio Balzan, 3
20121 Milano MI

Opening hours

9 - 14 april 2019
Opening time: 10:00 - 21:00

Concept Design Moreno Gentili - Testi Jacqueline Ceresoli, Silvia De Laude - Opere Bruna Ginammi, Mario Airò, Silvia Codignola, Melina Mulas, Ilaria Bochicchio, Marzia Migliora, Barbara Fässler - Coordinamento Domenico Cicchetti - Video Fabrizio Buratto

Braking is beautiful
Brembo has always been oriented towards research built upon innovation and ongoing experimentation, where design, which is functional and never an end unto itself, has progressively acquired a highly significant role.
This design focuses upon performance, but it has enabled beauty to align itself with the values upon which we base our activity: performance, reliability and comfort. The typical Italian trait of focusing on aesthetics is an expression of a cutting-edge form of manufacturing in which werecognise ourselves.. The lines and shapes of our calipers and discs have led to a unique and unmistakable style, appreciated all over the world.

The Designing Emotions project was therefore a natural development for Brembo, which combines industrial excellence and creative aptitude.
Alberto Bombassei
  • Culture and industry as a project
    di Silvia De Laude
    The relationship between Industry and Culture goes back a long way in Italy and can characterise the way we see literature, art, cinema, music and so on. In many cases, this relationship took the form of patronage, with tutelary deities behind it whose forward-thinking action is still alive today.
    It is difficult to pick someone to focus on from among the many different figures who, either by nature or inspiration, committed their financial and intellectual resources and personal energy to spreading culture.
    Remaining in Lombardy, one exemplary case is represented by Prospero Mosé Loria from Mantua, a businessman in the timber industry and founder of the Società Umanitaria in Milan, established with the objective of enhancing workers' skills and their financial situation through education and cooperation in the style of Mazzini.
    […]
    Some have seen industrial work as "a route to freedom" (Calvino) or as being favourable to social emancipation or the acquisition of a more mature class consciousness (Arpino, in the "Anni del giudizio", or Pratolini, in "Bruno Santini. A novel"). Some have grasped its twofold souls (Ermanno Rea, with "La dismissione", 2002). Others, such as Goffredo Parise, with a clever move in "The Boss" (1964), have described the industrial world from a psychological and metaphysical standpoint, reinventing the genre beyond all neorealist clichés.
    However, there are also writers, including some very recent ones, who could suggest a revival of industrial literature – Sebastiano Nata, Carmine Abate, Raffaele Nigro, Erri De Luca, Goffredo Buccini, Laura Pariani, Silvia Avallone, Massimiliano Santarossa, Andrea Valente, and also Alberto Prunetti, "Amianto" (Agenzia X), author of a terrible "working history" that fits into the ideal groove carved out by Bianciardi-Cassola's "Minatori della Maremma"; Angelo Ferracuti, with "Costo della vita" (Einaudi); Francesco Targhetta, who in his recent novel in verse "Perciò veniamo bene nelle fotografie" (isbn) looked back to "The Girl Carla" by Elio Pagliarani (but also had Bernari's "Tre operai" in mind) and has gone on to be a finalist in the Premio Campiello and the Premio Bergamo with his very recent "Le vite potenziali" (Mondadori 2007).
    […]
    Industry operates on an uncertain market today, but the industrial awareness of art and literature, fostered by scholars who as ever have the virtuous relationship between art and forward-thinking business at heart, has never been lost, but continues to explore forms of communication that paint a picture of a technological research that places Italy among the best in the world in various production sectors. There is naturally still much to be done, especially today, but Italians and their Design are second to none.
    Silvia De Laude
    A romance philologist by training, writer and literary critic, she has contributed to publishing projects with Cesare Garboli and has edited with Walter Siti the complete works of Pier Paolo Pasolini as part of Mondadori 'Meridiani' collection. In the 'Edizione Nazionale ed Europea delle Opere di Alessandro Manzoni' she edited theessay 'Del romanzo storico e, in genere, de' componimenti misti di storia e d'invenzione', with introduction by Folco Portinari and foreword by Giovanni Macchia, 2000. Her commented edition of Pasolini's posthumously published novel, 'Petrolio', was published as part of the Mondadori Oscar collection in 2005. Her publications include 'Mario Mieli: E adesso', Clichy, Florence 2016. 'I due Pasolini. Ragazzi di vita prima della censura', Carocci, Rome 2018. 'La rondine di Pasolini', Mimesis, Milan 2018. 'L'attualità di Leopardi' in 'Giovani Parole', Bracco Foundation 2019. To be published shortly: 'Fly Traslove Airways', a text on 'Petrolio' by Pasolini and 'Il risveglio dei Faraoni' by Mario Mieli, Saggiatore.
  • Forms of industry in the art of beauty
    di Jacqueline Ceresoli
    What are industry's responsibilities in terms of artistic production during the global era? Infinite and varied, because everything depends on the context, place, relationship and objective. Art without industry, which has supported innovation and creativity over the years, devalues the role of the artist as a social agent for relations between different worlds and ways of expressing creativity. When industry promotes art, ideas and experimentation with new styles, without necessarily advertising its product, it is legitimate to put forward the idea of a project of shared beauty: an unwritten pact of social aesthetics between the artist and industry, tracking down a beautiful and perhaps useful need to transform daily life and reality through multiple aesthetic solutions. In the early twentieth century, European art was overwhelmed by the powerful shock of new industrial system based on models of collective living, when art and life exchange visual codes and grammars, as demonstrated by Marcel Duchamp's ready mades and by his followers of yesterday and today.
    […]
    New ideas without backing from daring and visionary entrepreneurs of creativity do not take shape and no investment is made in new images. The Russian Constructivists, working on the Communist front, were convinced of the need to merge art and utilitarian tensions, sealing an underlying relationship of exchange between art and industry. Andy Warhol made his debut as a graphic designer in the mid-1950s, when he produced ads for Miller. In the post-war period, when Europe was overcome by the euphoria of rebuilding its industrial and cultural fabric, it promoted free enterprise and art became a product of consumer society, rooted within our industrial system. During those years, Italy established an industrial manufacturing system of small, medium-sized and large enterprises, with manufacturing districts dotted from north to south.
    […]
    When industry supports the figurative arts or environmental interventions within important landscapes, it produces beauty. This is the case of Niki De Saint Phalle, commissioned by Marella Agnelli to create the Giardino dei Tarocchi in Garavicchio, in Maremma, which also features a kinetic sculpture by Jean Tinguely. And we should not forget Arnaldo Pomodoro, an internationally renowned sculptor who created the Carapace, a piece of architectural sculpture named after its shape that recalls a tortoise — symbol of longevity and stability, as well as the union between heaven and earth — for Marcello Lunelli, deputy chairman of the Cantine Ferrari, and his family, and designed for the Tenuta Castelbuono, which makes Montefalco Sagrantino wine, in the heart of Umbria, a place where beauty is inscribed within the landscape and local culture. […] In business culture, creativity is the most solid industry of the new, of a potential beauty that should be saved from the risks posed by the standardisation of the global era.
    Jacqueline Ceresoli
    Historian, critic, visual and contemporary arts theorist specialised in industrial archaeology. She works as a correspondent and critic for L'Arca, Il Giornale, Exibart and other publications. Her publications include: 'Opere Recenti. Gianfranco Pardi', Milan, 1998; 'La nuova scena urbana. Cittàstrattismo e urban art', F.Angeli, Milan 2005. 'Grazia Varisco', Skira, Milan 2006. 'Athos Collura Visual Codex', Skira, Milan 2007. 'Light Abstr- Action, Maria Cristiana Fioretti', Mazzotta, Milan 2010. 'Trans-Design- L'identità ibrida e contaminata dei prodotti di inizio millennio', Tecniche Nuove 2008. 'Anne Blanchet Light Drawings', Silvana Editoriale, Milan 2014. 'Arte Sociale', in Forme dell'Inclusività, Antonio Longo, Chiara Rabbiosi, Pierluigi Salvadeo (eds.), Politecnica, Maggioni Editore 2017. In early 2019, she has launched a series of conferences on the subject of innovation and culture with several firms, including Milan-based Fratelli Branca.